Takht (Punjabi: ਤਖ਼ਤ)

Which literally means a throne or seat of authority is a result of historical growth of Sikhism. There are five Takhts and these Takhts are the five gurudwaras which have a very special significance for the Sikh community. The first and the most important one was established by Guru Hargobind in 1609. It is called ‘Akal Takht’ (the Throne of the Timeless God) and is situated just opposite the gate of Harmandir Sahib – The Golden Temple, Amritsar.

While the Harmandir Sahib, or Golden Temple, represents Sikh spiritual guidance, the Akal Takht symbolizes the dispensing of justice and temporal activity. It is the highest seat of temporal authority of the Khalsa and the seat of the Sikh religion’s earthly authority. Here the Guru held his court and decided matters of military strategy and political policy. Later on, the Sikh Nation (Sarbat Khalsa) took decisions here on matters of peace and war and settled disputes between the various Sikh groups. The Sarangi singers sung the ballads of the Sikh Gurus and warriors at this place and robes of honour (saropas) were awarded to persons who rendered distinguished services of the community of men in general.

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Akal Takht Sahib literally means Eternal Throne. It is also part of the Golden Temple complex in Amritsar. Its foundation was laid by Guru Hargobind Sahib, the sixth Sikh Guru. The Akal Takht is situated opposite to Harmandir Sahib and are connected by a passage. The building of the Akal Takht opposite the Golden Temple has a special meaning. While the Golden Temple stands for spiritual guidance the Akal Takht symbolizes the dispensing of justice and temporal activity. During the day the Guru Granth Sahib is kept in the Golden Temple, while at night it is kept in the Akal Takht Sahib. In earlier days all Sikh warriors sought blessings here before going to battle fields. During the 18th century while Sikhs were fighting a guerrilla war in the forests they used to gather at the Akal Takht on special occasions such as Baisakhi and Diwali. Here the community used to have general meetings and approve resolutions. The Akal Takht is the oldest of the Five Takhts.

 

The Gurdwara at Patna Sahib  (Punjabi: ਤਖ਼ਤ ਸ੍ਰੀ ਪਟਨਾ ਸਾਹਿਬ) was in remembrance of the birthplace of Guru Gobind Singh Ji, the tenth Guru of the Sikhs on 22 December 1666, and like many historical Gurdwara’s in India and Pakistan, this Gurdwara too, was built by Maharaja Ranjit Singh (1780-1839), the first Maharaja of the Sikh Empire, on the banks of Ganges river, in Patna, Bihar.

 

 

 

Takht Sri Keshgarh Sahib is the birthplace of the Khalsa. Amid the Shivalik hills, it is situated on the bank of the Satluj. The beat on the Ranjit Nagara has been striking a terror in the minds of the tyrants. For the common man its resonance came to be a divine melody, his guardian angel. He bowed in obeisance to it. It is the place that commemorates the miracle of ‘celebrating the scum of humanity’ and a wonder of the divine and transcendent guru-disciple matrix. After purchasing land of Makhowal, Sri Guru Tegh Bahadur Sahib designated it as Chak Nanki. Later, it came to be popularized as Anandpur Sahib.

When Bhai Jaita presented himself to the Great Guru Sri Guru Gobind Singh Ji with reverential, decapitated head of Sri Guru Tegh Bahadur Sahib, the former burst out spontaneously: ‘This is the ground for founding the Panth….’ It is the place where Five Piyaras offered their heads to the Guru Playfully. The divine nectar (Amrit) was prepared in a broad metallic vessel, with a mini but broad rapier and the Piyaras were baptised by the Great Guru.

The Khalsa is my form
I live within the Khalsa…
The Khalsa is my Satguru

It was this place that is the starting point of India’s decisive struggle for independence in his family. The struggle continued until the saffron-coloured flag was hoisted on the Royal Fort at Lahore. So much is the Khalsa attached to this hallowed place that the Sikh feels elated to be called a dweller of ANANDPURI.

 

The Takht Sri Darbar Sahib Damdama Sahib, one of the five Takhts or Seat of Temporal Authority of Sikhism, Takht Sri Damdama Sahib is in Bathinda in Punjab, India and is the place where Guru Gobind Singh, the tenth Sikh Guru, prepared the full version of the Sikh scriptures called Sri Guru Granth Sahib in 1705. The other four Takhts are the Akal Takht, Takht Sri Keshgarh Sahib, Takht Sri Patna Sahib and Takht Sri Hazur Sahib.

 

 

 

Hazūr Sāhib ( ਹਜੂਰ ਸਾਹਿਬ)  means presence of the master, also spelled Hazoor Sahib, more called as Takht Sachkhand Shri Hazur Abchalnagar Sahib and also known as Abchal Nagar, is one of the five takhts (“thrones”, seats of temporal authority) in Sikhism. It is located on the banks of the River Godavari at the city of Nanded in the state of Maharashtra, Western India. It is where the 10th guru, Guru Gobind Singh Ji completed his last breath. The gurudwara within the complex is known Sach-Khand “Realm of Truth”.

The structure is built at the place of death of Guru Gobind Singh. The inner room of the gurdwara is called the Angitha Sahib and is built over the place where Guru Gobind Singh was cremated in 1708. The construction of the gurdwara was done from 1832 to 1837 by order of Maharaja Ranjit Singh (1780–1839).